Posts Tagged ‘emergency management’

Concepts of Innovation and Maintenance in Emergency Management Planning

Wednesday, October 4th, 2017

Authors: Michael Goldsbury, Emergency Management Associate, IEM and Lee Zelewicz, Emergency Management Associate, IEM

This article was originally published in the IAEM Bulletin, Vol. 34, No. 9 September 2017.

 

New Ideas and Old Problems

Innovation and maintenance are terms tossed around a lot when it comes to emergency planning, and plenty of other fields and professions for that matter. An emergency plan might be considered innovative if it uses a new approach, promotes the use of new technology, or borrows ideas from other fields. For example, a recent trend towards managing plans through shared, online storage is one example of a low-cost, innovative approach that is growing in popularity, and increasing secure access to plans. (more…)

The Challenge of Developing Situational Awareness During Hurricane Disasters—Part Three: Understanding the Impact (or the “What’s Next?”)

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016

Author: Jim Weldin, Senior Emergency Planner, IEM

This is Part 3 of a three-part series on hurricane analysis. Part 1, “Determining the What,” dealt with anticipating the impact of a tropical system and Part 2, “Consequences (Or the ‘So What?’)” focused on consequence management. 

Hurricane Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City on October 29, 2012, at approximately 8 p.m. The 933-kilometer-wide storm produced 158 kph winds as it moved northwest toward the New Jersey coast as a Category 1 hurricane. A new state record was set for the lowest recorded barometric pressure (an indicator of storm strength), which was measured at 27.94 inches at landfall.

Hurricane Sandy’s impacts on New Jersey included high winds with hurricane-force gusts, storm surge, and significant rainfall. Surge heights were considered major to record-level—i.e., in the 6- to 9-foot range—along the coast, resulting in major inundation of coastal areas and flooding of barrier islands. Rainfall levels totaled up to 7 inches for most locations in New Jersey. (more…)

The Challenge of Developing Situational Awareness During Hurricane Disasters—Part Two: Consequences (Or the “So What?”)

Monday, June 13th, 2016

Author: Jim Weldin, Senior Emergency Planner, IEM

This is Part 2 of a three-part series on hurricane analysis. Part 1, “Determining the What,” dealt with anticipating the impact of a tropical system. We discussed various tools and projections used by the New Jersey Office of Emergency Management to predict the potential impact of a tropical system. This post focuses on consequence management.

Historical data on the impact of past storms was useful in projecting potential consequences in New Jersey from Hurricane Sandy. In addition, FEMA, through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), provided maps of flood-prone areas and historical data on property flooding insurance claims as part of its mission to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures. GIS mapping helped emergency managers define facilities most at risk, including key residences and businesses; hospitals and schools; and critical infrastructure, such as power plants, water/wastewater treatment facilities, and police, fire, and emergency medical service (EMS) stations. (more…)

Chemical Company Safety and Security Mandates with Feds on All Sides

Thursday, April 28th, 2011

Author: David Willauer, Manager, Transportation & Geospatial Technologies Division, IEM

In a country with many regulatory measures, chemical companies face federal mandates from all sides. Such mandates include operational safety, increased security measures, emergency preparedness and reporting. Some of these mandates from different federal agencies are in conflict with one another. Every federal law related to hazardous materials has its own unique definition.  Common terms are hazardous materials (DOT and OSHA), hazardous substance (CERCLA), listed chemical (TRI and RMP) and listed and characteristic wastes (RCRA).

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Conducting a Proper Capability Assessment

Tuesday, August 10th, 2010

Author: Chris Hiles, MS, BSN, RN, Emergency Manager, IEM

My fourth article on emergency management focuses on doing a proper capability assessment. I wanted to make sure that people were thinking in terms of the big picture and not just focusing in on planning, purchasing supplies, or training people. They need to be aware that all of these things, and many others, make the difference in a response.

http://nursing.advanceweb.com/Features/Articles/Defining-the-Big-Picture.aspx

Does Trust Matter in Managing Emergencies?

Thursday, August 5th, 2010

Author: Mark Scott, Manager of Critical Infrastructure, IEM

When emergencies occur — hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, floods, wildfires, winter storms, pandemics, terrorism, hazmat spills, radiation leaks, and more – people expect government to act. Emergency managers at all levels must move quickly and effectively to protect life and property. And to do so, they need something that is increasingly scarce: the public’s trust.

Many observers believe we live today in an era of mistrust. Poll after poll has chronicled the continuing decline of trust for our major institutions, especially the public sector. In its most recent “Trust in Government” survey, the Pew Research Center found that “By almost every conceivable measure Americans are less positive and more critical of government these days.” Building on previous surveys, the 2010 report found that half of the population continues to believe government runs its programs inefficiently; that there has been a sharp increase in the last decade in people believing that government has the wrong priorities; and that the number of people who believe the federal government has a negative effect on their day-to-day lives has also increased (to 43%). (more…)